How Classic Is Redman's Malpractice Album? | Review

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How Classic: 3.5 / 6

RELEASED: May 22, 2001

By May 2001, when Malpractice was released, Redman had a lot of success with his solo albums, the Def Squad album, and the Blackout album with Method Man. He was set to star in weed comedy How High with Method Man, and you could sense that the success was making his music less important. He was no longer the underground rapper who appeared on EPMD’s Business As Usual album. Now Redman’s first single shared the same beat as Christina Aguilera’s first single, “Dirrty”, he also guested on her album. A lot had changed since his days of coming up in the bricks.

 Redman’s cartoon shows Doc taking out an entire army with about 40 guns (from  Malpractice  CD inlay)

Redman’s cartoon shows Doc taking out an entire army with about 40 guns (from Malpractice CD inlay)

 Doc smoking weed with Bill Clinton (from  Malpractice  artwork)

Doc smoking weed with Bill Clinton (from Malpractice artwork)

The Best Tracks

Malpractice begins with a bizarre intro titled “Roller Coaster Malpractice” with an English guide talks about how dangerous and scary the ride is going to be. It’s neither funny nor entertaining. This does not bode too well for the album.

The first track following that lame skit is titled “Diggy Doc” and it’s really short and not that exciting, although it has sort of an old school vibe. The second track, “Lick A Shot” is more in the style of Doc’s Da Name 2000, but it’s not too exciting either despite production from Erick Sermon.

 Cartoon artwork from Redman’s  Malpractice  album

Cartoon artwork from Redman’s Malpractice album

The fourth track, “Let’s Get Dirty (I Can’t Get In Da Club)”, is produced by Rockwilder and spawned a Christina Aguilera version. A strange turn of events for the Brick City rapper. Musically it’s pretty good, not outstanding, and DJ Kool adlibbing adds a good amount of energy.

After a decent skit, “2-Way Madness”, we get a funky posse cut titled “Real Niggaz, which features legendary Houston rapper Scarface, as well as Treach (Naughty By Nature), Mally G (Illegal), and Icarus.

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“Da Bullshit” is produced by Erick Sermon and Redman raps with a nice flow over this beat. Nothing too exciting, but a decent Red track. Next is a lengthy skit “Who Wants To F*** A Millionaire”, before the high energy “Enjoy Da Ride” comes in. It’s basically the unofficial title track because it has the same English presenter from the intro as well as having a roller coaster theme to it. The silly sounding track features Method Man, Street Life, and Canadian rapper Saukrates.

 Sooperman Luva lover in action from the  Malpractice  album artwork

Sooperman Luva lover in action from the Malpractice album artwork

“Jerry Swinger Stickup” is a pretty funny installment of the stickup theme skit which Redman started doing on Muddy Waters. The skit transitions into to “J.U.M.P.” which is produced by Erick Sermon and has some late 90s Dr. Dre sounds in the chorus. Featured on the song we have George Clinton Jr. (son of P-Funk inventor) doing some spoken word. He sounds almost identical to his father.

Next, the DJ Twinz produced “Muf-Fucka” starts off sounding really dope, but as you would expect from a song which ends every line with “muh-fucka” it gets a little repetitious. After that track we get a proper Brick City posse cut produced by Erick Sermon. “Bricks Two” features D-Don, Double-O, Roz, Shooga Bear, and Pacewon and it’s really good, which is surprising considering the mediocrity similar tracks on previous Red albums.

 Redman’s Doc cartoon character dodging bullets in the  Malpractice  album artwork

Redman’s Doc cartoon character dodging bullets in the Malpractice album artwork

Next Keith Murray (Def Squad) lends his rapping to the Erick Sermon produced “Wrong 4 Dat” which is slightly comical. Following that track we have another skit “Judge Juniqua” which is pretty boring, but the following track “Dat Bitch” is actually pretty good. The beat has a 70s retro feel to it courtesy of producer Da Mascot. While “Doggz II” says that it features DMX but it’ s only a sample?!?!

Next is part five of the Sooperman Lover song series, (much like EPMD’s “Jane” series). This time there are two parts to the song, which are totally unrelated musically. This doesn’t make much sense and Erick Sermon produced “Soopaman Luva 5 - Prt. I” is the best of the two. It features the feel and vibe we have gotten used to (and fits the best) while part II sounds more like a standard Redman track.

 The Doc pounding out a easter bunny in disguise, UFC style. From  Malpractice  artwork

The Doc pounding out a easter bunny in disguise, UFC style. From Malpractice artwork

Redman ends Malpractice like he did Doc’s Da Name, with a UK dance style track, which is decent but doesn’t warrant any repeated listens.

Malpractice marked a down period (critically) for Redman, and it would be quite a few years before he started to regain the fire of his 90s material. This album just sounds too pop and somewhat uninspired. Not surprisingly it’s on the posse cuts where we get to hear the most hungry MCs. Basically, Redman had gotten complacent due to his repeated successes and it showed on Malpractice.

 Tracklist for Redman’s  Malpractice  (CD back cover)

Tracklist for Redman’s Malpractice (CD back cover)

Alexander Ramalho